目前日期文章:201106 (25)

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Libya today
The Libyan Head of State is neither a king, a president nor a prime minister. Colonel Gaddafi is always referred to in official documents as the “Brother Leader and Guide of the Revolution”. He came to power as the result of a coup d’etat in 1969 when Gaddafi was only 27, and a junior officer in the army. He took over from ailing King Idris and his nephew the Crown Prince Sayyid Hasan ar-Rida al-Mahdi as-Sanussi. In 1977, he proclaimed a “People’s Revolution”, changed the name of the country to “The Great Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya”, and established “revolutionary committees” to replace political parties. Last year Libya celebrated the 40th anniversary of the revolution and today, without ever having been elected, because elections are forbidden, and without any official function at all, he still leads a country of 6 million people. He is the only person with executive powers, and no criticism or opposition is allowed. His policy was set out in his “Green Book” published in 1975; a mixture of socialism and direct democracy. In response to the recent upheavals in Tunisia and Egypt, he has recently lowered prices for basic foodstuffs and medicines, and given easier access to credit. Over the years, living conditions for ordinary people have improved. Women’s rights have been reinforced. Women are in the forefront of Gaddafi’s security arrangements, an all-woman team accompanying him on all official engagements. In 1984, a bill was published in which polygamy was abolished, divorce was authorised, and forced marriage made illegal. But these socio-economic advances have been offset by political regression. Political parties and trade unions are outlawed. NGOs are tolerated but only as long as their aims are in line with the Libyan revolution. Libya remains a tribal society, controlled by parental and family ties, even down to their football clubs. This complicates political movements and makes any effective opposition quasi-impossible. Any determined sign of discontent is paid off with the proceeds of Libyan oil fields. At the summit of the African Union in February 2009, Gaddafi pursued one of his pet projects – to found a United States of Africa and to spread his revolutionary ideology across the continent. His elite audience included two of his most politically-minded sons, one an avid revolutionary and the other a reformer with a positive attitude towards the construction of civil society. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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Investors upbeat on Apple after Jobs iPad speech
Investors reacted positively on Thursday to the surprise appearance by Apple CEO Steve Jobs at the launch of the new iPad 2 a day earlier. Jobs has been on medical leave since late January with an undisclosed condition. In midday trading on the Nasdaq stock exchange in New York, the price of Apple shares had risen by more than six dollars to 358 dollars. The new iPad is thinner, lighter and faster than its predecessor, which was launched last April. Jobs’s reappearance comes as Apple’s rivals are launching their own tablet computers. The new iPad goes on sale in Europe on March 25, with prices starting at 499 euros. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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Plainclothes policemen arrest a protester in Beijing
Protesters gathered in central Beijing following a call on internet social networkss for a “Jasmine Revolution” in China inspired by uprisings in North Africa and the Middle East. REUTERS/David Gray Copyright © 2011 euronews

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Skies to get more crowded says IATA
The number of airline tickets sold is expected to rise to 3.3 billion by 2014 from 2009’s two and a half billion – an increases of nearly a third. The International Air Transport Association is making that prediction based on strong growth in Asia, particularly China. Global airlines have seen a strong rebound from the sharp downturn in 2009 as economies, notably in Asia, have recovered from the recession. But the international air body said the effects of the global recession were still affecting parts of the industry. “The shadow of the global economic recession is expected to remain over parts of the industry for some time to come,” IATA director general Giovanni Bisignani said. In December, IATA revised up its profit forecast for the whole airline industry to $9.1 billion this year from a previous estimate of $5.3 billion. Last year’s profit of the industry was estimated at $15.1 billion, compared to September’s forecast of 8.9 billion. The numbers compared to a total industry loss of $9.9 billion in 2009. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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Shi’ite opposition leader returns to Bahrain
A hardline Shi’ite dissident has returned home to Bahrain from exile to join the burgeoning opposition to the island kingdom’s Sunni royal family. London-based Hassan Mushaimaa is the leader of the Haq movement. He was tried in his absence over an alleged coup plot but received a pardon as part of the ruling family’s concessions. “The talk about change and reforms should not be just patchy,” he said on his arrival at Manama. “We have to have real change or the people have to carry on (protesting). The demands are up to the people on the ground who died there and faced everything.” Pearl Square remains the focus of opposition protests. But today thousands marched on the former prime minister’s residence to call for the removal of a man who has been in his post for 40 years. This week, the government freed more than 300 people detained since a crackdown on Shi’ite unrest in August. The cabinet has also been reshuffled in another sop to the opposiition. But neither move appears likely to end widespread protests. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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EU microfinance: small amounts, big help
Microfinance projects are getting underway in Europe. The first two are in the Netherlands and Belgium. Making access to credit easier is one thing the EU is doing to help people in the wake of the financial crisis. So, how does it work? Copyright © 2011 euronews

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Food and fuel short in quake-hit areas of Japan
Queues of several kilometres long have been reported, as petrol runs short in the areas of Japan hit by last week’s earthquake and tsunami. Conditions are hard in Sendai but anyone who wants to follow official advice and leave will find it hard. As well as the lack of petrol, there is no public transport out of the city. The British embassy has laid on coaches to take people as far as Tokyo. In some places, getting fuel is the main concern. In others, like here in Takahagi City, the worry is water. The Japanese government has mobilised 100,000 extra troops to deliver supplies to stricken areas like this. Food shortages are also common, even in areas that were not damaged in last Friday’s double disaster. Problems with transport and access mean many people are stocking up on basics like bread and rice and the shelves are emptied as soon as they are filled. Miyako Elementary School is home to more than 500 evacuees – more than half of them over 70. It is warmer than out in the open, but even so, many are getting sick. A total of 450 thousand people are thought to be homeless. Many are asking why their government has not done more to help them. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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Women wary of new Egypt constitution
There are concerns in Egypt that the country’s post-revolution constitution will fail to fully represent women. In the weeks leading up to the downfall of authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak, women played their role in the push for democracy and were a visible presence in the crowds at Tahrir Square. It’s estimated that women made up between 20 percent and 50 percent of protesters. A lack of any sort of meaningful political representation under Mubarak gave them as much as, if not more reason to demand change than their male counterparts. Yet many Egyptian women fear that despite their part in deposing Mubarak, they will be denied their just rewards in the post-Mubarak Egypt. When the military took full control of the country last month, it appointed Tarek al-Bishry to form a committee that would change the constitution to make it comply with what the protesters had been risking their lives to demand. That committee has eight members, most of them politicians and judges, all of them men. It is perhaps then not a great surprise that women’s groups are wary that the all-male committee may deprive them of their full rights in the new democratic process. The Egyptian Coalition for Civic Education and Women’s Participation has reviewed the proposed amendments to the constitution and identified points of concern. For example, Article 75 guarantees that “Egypt’s president is born to two Egyptian parents and cannot be married to a non-Egyptian woman. Neither he nor his parents shall have another nationality except the Egyptian one. He shall practice his own civil and political rights.” The fact that the president cannot be married to a non-Egyptian woman suggests that the president must be a man. As does the phrase “He shall practice…” The interim military leadership has set a date of March 19 for a referendum on constitutional changes ahead of parliamentary and presidential elections in June and August respectively. Egypt’s women have little time left to make sure the change they worked so hard to make possible becomes a reality. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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Libyan diplomats reject Gaddafi’s “brutal regime”
In an unprecedented move, most of Libya’s mission to the United Nations in New York has revolted against Gaddafi, vowing to represent the people not the government from now on. Ibrahim Dabbashi said they were taking the action because of the regime’s despicable action in attacking the Libyan people: “We have never been with Gaddafi, we are with the people and we just made a statement to ask the international community to intervene to do something to help the Libyan people who are facing genocide in Tripoli. Also he is facing crimes against humanity in all the eastern cities of Libya,” he said. As protesters showed their support for the uprising outside UN headquarters, the diplomat and his colleagues called for help from the UN. They want it to establish a no-fly zone above Libya to prevent mercenaries from being flown in and to establish a safe passage for medical supplies to help treat the injured. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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European markets at close: 25.02.11
A roundup of the days markets data from euronews.net, brought to you as video on demand. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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UK criteria for Libya no-fly zone ‘satisfied’
The British Foreign Secretary has explained his decision to push the no-fly resolution against Libya at the UN Security Council. William Hague spoke after the resolution authorizing “all necessary measures“??� codename for military action. He said the three criteria that Britain was seeking to see satisfied had been done so. He said to be able to take action a “demonstrable need” should be present, which Gaddafi??�s regime has provided in the recent days. He also said a “legal basis” was required that now the UN resolution provides. Mr. Hague said the third aspect was a “broad support from within the region itself and that is evident in the statement of the Arab League and in the readiness to participate in a no fly zone, for instance, by members of the Arab League.” The resolution passed after 10 of the 15 Security Council members voted in favour. There were no votes against but China and Russia were among five abstentions. The vote in New York was attended by Tripoli??�s ambassador to the UN, Mohamed Shalgham, who last month publicly denounced the Libyan leader. The UK as well as France took the lead in drafting the resolution and were co-sponsors. Mr. Hague said: “We have said all along that Gaddafi must go; that the Libyan people must be able to have a more representative Government and determine their own future. And it is necessary to take these measures to avoid greater bloodshed, to try to stop what is happening in terms of the attacks on civilians and on the people of Libya.” By Ali SheikholeslamiLondon Correspondentali.sheikholeslami@euronews.net Do you agree with the UN resolution authorising military action in Libya? A Javascript enabled browser that accepts cookies is required in order to participate in the poll. yes (52%)  no (45%)  i don't know (3%)  // pollTS[0]) { pollTS = cookie; cValid = true; }; }; warning.parentNode.removeChild(warning); if(cookie && cValid) { for(var i = 1; i < pollTS.length; i++) { votes += parseInt(pollTS[i], 10) || 0; }; var total = 0; for(var i = 1; i < pollTS.length; i++) { per = pollTS[i] > 0 ? Math.round(pollTS[i] / (votes / 100)) : 0; if(total + per > 100) { per = 100 - total; total = 100; } else { total += per; }; output[output.length] = '' + questions[i - 1] + ' (' + per + '%) '; }; pollHTML += "" + output.join("") + ""; }; if(!cookie) { pollHTML = ' yes no i don’t know'; }; if(pollHTML) { content.innerHTML = pollHTML; }; })();// ]]> Copyright © 2011 euronews

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Frankfurt gunman inspired by ‘radical Islam’
German police say a suspected gunman who shot dead two US airmen at Frankfurt Airport operated alone and was probably inspired by radical Islamist beliefs. Arid Uka, a 21-year-old postal worker of Kosovan origin, has allegedly confessed. Posts on his Facebook account are said to praise jihadists and denounce non-Muslims as infidels. Neighbours from his Frankfurt suburb said they were shocked. One woman said that he was often lone and did not have any friends on the estate. “Although there are some bad people here for the police to deal, he was not that type and was very withdrawn,” she said. Investigators believe the suspect was not part of a wider terror network and was radicalised on the Internet. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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Shi’ite opposition leader returns to Bahrain
A hardline Shi’ite dissident has returned home to Bahrain from exile to join the burgeoning opposition to the island kingdom’s Sunni royal family. London-based Hassan Mushaimaa is the leader of the Haq movement. He was tried in his absence over an alleged coup plot but received a pardon as part of the ruling family’s concessions. “The talk about change and reforms should not be just patchy,” he said on his arrival at Manama. “We have to have real change or the people have to carry on (protesting). The demands are up to the people on the ground who died there and faced everything.” Pearl Square remains the focus of opposition protests. But today thousands marched on the former prime minister’s residence to call for the removal of a man who has been in his post for 40 years. This week, the government freed more than 300 people detained since a crackdown on Shi’ite unrest in August. The cabinet has also been reshuffled in another sop to the opposiition. But neither move appears likely to end widespread protests. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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New Zealand police: ‘it remains a rescue operation’
The official death toll from the earthquake in Christchurch, New Zealand has risen to 98. There are fears in New Zealand that many more bodies will be dragged lifeless from the rubble in the coming days. Yesterday there had been applause as a survivor was brought out. But hopes are beginning to fade of finding others alive, more than two days after the 6.3 magnitude quake. Japanese specialists have joined other foreign teams and plenty of volunteers on the ground, to search for about 200 people still missing. Meanwhile, across the city the race is on to restore water and power supplies. “Yesterday we had about 65 percent of the customers back on. Tonight, we’re aiming to have 75 percent of the customers back on,” said local power executive Roger Sutton. “Compared to the September 4th event (last year’s earthquake), it’s a much, much larger event for us. We’ve a lot more damage.” The army’s presence – to keep order and keep people away from unstable areas – may be reassuring. It is also a reminder of the gravity of the situation. The authorities say they are still involved in a rescue operation, but a fire chief said they had no signs of life. For others, life is anything but normal as they struggle to cope with collapsed and unsafe buildings, broken roads and flooded sewers. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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Boulet: France’s favourite comic book blogger
French cartoonist Boulet is known in comic book circles as one of?�the leading comic strip bloggers in the Francophone world.?�He started his blog in French back in 2004 and its success prompted him to publish an English language version almost a year and a half ago.?�Euronews caught up with Boulet (real name Gilles Roussel) at his exhibition/workshop in Lyon, France. For five days he welcomed comic book afficionados and sketched the memories of some of them whose names?�were chosen out of a hat. The resulting cartoons will be on show in the city’s Le Bocal until April 17.?�He found time between scribbling to talk about his work.?�Euronews: Your latest book, ‘Notes 5: Quelques minutes avant la fin du monde’ (‘Minutes before the end of the world’) is your blog material in book form. Why the change in format??�Boulet: ?�“The transfer to paper is a necessity. The blog made my name but it’s the albums from the blog that make me a living. Personally, I see a huge advantage in the transition: it allows new audiences to come to comic books. I have plenty of readers who?�have gone?�into comic book shops for the first time since ‘Notes’ came out.?�Euronews: Why do you think that has been the case? Boulet at work Boulet:?�“It’s not really the same kind of reader. I believe that comics, no matter what you might say, remain something of a ‘luxury’ item. To be interested enough to go into a book store and flick through comics isn’t really that mainstream. But on the internet,?�the viral side of things comes into play. On the blog, I think I’ve got a lot of computer technicians who are just bored at work or students skipping lessons. If one of them likes a?�sketch, he sends it to a friend, who in turn sends it to 12 friends, who send it on to 24 others. And you end up reaching a?�huge amount of people. And?�those readers aren’t?�necessarily?�book lovers.”?�?�Euronews: You’ve taken part in the site Les autres gens which offers comic strips for a subscription cost. Does this formula work or are hard copies still the only way for a cartoonist to make a living??�Boulet:?�“That’s the whole debate about digital comic strips. I liked the concept put forward by Thomas Cad??ne, the founder of ‘Les Autres Gens’. He wanted to try another format that would allow this type of comic strip to become viable. But a lot of readers find it scandalous to be asked to pay for comics online, even at just three euros a month. Psychologically it’s a big obstacle to get over. New platforms like tablets are getting a lot of attention in the industry. As it’s natural to buy applications for these platforms, maybe it would seem more normal to pay a subscription to read comics online.”?�Euronews: You launched your blog in 2004. Since then the internet has taken on a much more social dimension. Have these changes transformed your way of working??�Boulet:?�“Yes, of course! My blog has evolved from the start. In 2004, blogs were half way between a forum and a social network with a kind of ‘tell my life story’ aspect. Small communities of people, writers, graphic designers, photographers started to emerge through the blogs. Some friends of mine who were comic strip writers started blogging and I just followed. There was a very intimate side to it. Out of the 500 readers I had at the time, I think I had probably met about 150 of them in real life. But then as the numbers started to rise, I began to write more fiction.”?�Euronews: For a few months now you’ve been using Twitter and facebook. Do these social networks enrich your relationship with your readers??�Boulet:?�“It means I get lots of photos of kittens, yes! In fact Twitter feeds my curiosity. I use it to follow the news, to follow other professional cartoonists, doctors, lawyers. I don’t think Twitter changes much for me in terms of my readers. As for facebook, to begin with I used it as a sort of online diary. But I got bored with that and so I started to use it to post old work that had never been published. I also share photos taken by my readers who show my albums being taken all around France and the rest of the world. The relationship with the reader is much more playful. For me anyway.”?�?�Euronews: Your two exhibitions at Le Bocal are interactive.?�Is that a blogger’s touch or a performer’s touch??�Boulet drew the memories of some of the visitors to the exhibition Boulet:?�“It’s a bit of both. Compared to the job of comic strip creator, I like the direct interaction with readers that the blog allows. It’s so much?�less suffocating than sitting alone working at home and not knowing whether what you’re doing is worth anything or how people are going to like?�it. “For comic strip exhibitions the author and the exhibition?�organiser choose some sketches, hang them on the wall and then wait and see if they’re going?�to be sold. Personally that doesn’t really interest me. For the requests, I only have three minutes for each reader, just the time to draw something before they let the next person have their turn. It’s very frustrating for me and for them. They sometimes say they would rather have more time to talk even if it meant not having a sketch. “So for the two exhibitions I wanted to relive the blog experience and make it possible to meet people. After the 2008 exhibition (at Le Bocal) we gave to each person the cartoon that?�they had inspired. This year we won’t give people the drawings and neither will we sell them, but the visitors here are still taking part because I am drawing their own personal memories. The people who are drawn?�out of the hat actively guide me through the sketch because I ask?�for details as I’m drawing. In the end, these sketches belong to everybody and not only to me.“?� Copyright © 2011 euronews

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European markets at close: 02.03.11
A roundup of the days markets data from euronews.net, brought to you as video on demand. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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Adele’s new album
Adele’s latest album 21 has already hit number 1 in several European countries; now it is out in the US.?�Despite the north Londoner’s runaway success, the album’s theme was born out of failure: the break-up with her boyfriend. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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Defiant Berlusconi vows to see out term
Is the party over for Silvio Berlusconi? Several of today’s Italian newspapers believe early elections are inevitable after the prime minister was indicted for trial over alleged sex offences and abuse of power. Prosecutors say they have ample evidence he paid for sex with an underage prostitute and intervened with police to try to free her from custody. Berlusconi insists it is business as usual. He claims his coalition partners remain on board in government and has vowed to see out his term until 2013. “I can only say one thing: I’m not worried at all. Okay? That’s all,” he smiled as he spoke at a news conference. The Moroccan dancer known as Ruby, at the centre of the case, has denied having sex with Berlusconi but admits receiving several thousand euros after going to a party at his villa. The prime minister, who denies any wrongdoing, believes the charges are politically motivated. He still has his backers: “I judge him as a politician who’s made a big contribution, and will continue to do so for the good of Italy,” said one man in Rome. “They only talk about this … enough is enough. They’re not talking about politics anymore. They’re talking just about him…that’s all,” complained another. Satirists are having a field day. An Italian band has rewritten Shakira’s song Waka Waka, calling it “Bunga Bunga”… Berlusconi’s own term for his infamous parties. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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Algeria’s Bouteflika faces fine balancing act
Algeria’s president is offering concessions to his country’s population amid increasing protest. Abdelaziz Bouteflika is promising to lift a state of emergency that has been in force for the past 19 years, but people also want economic help. “The situation in Algeria, on a social level, is a bit difficult,” said one student. “The unemployment rate has risen. There are several factors.” Even one of the founders of the Algerian state has called on Bouteflika to respond to calls for political and economic reform. “It’s too hard,” one elderly woman said. “We can’t take it any more. Life is too expensive for workers or small pensioners like us. I think the young people who take to the streets are right.” Algeria is set for further demonstrations today. Protesters are promising to take to the streets every Saturday until their demands are met. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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Libyans abroad add their voices to protests back home
Across Europe Libyans have been voicing their opposition to the rule of Muammar Gaddafi. In Stockholm the Libyan embassy raised the flag of the monarchy,last seen in 1969 before the Gaddafi led coup. In central Vienna around 200 Libyan nationals lent their support to the protesters back home: “Gaddafi will not stop us anymore it is over,” said one man on the Stephansplatz. Similar protests have been held in Berlin with Libyans furious by the loss of life: “I have 13 brothers, they are all fighting there. On Saturday my father was killed in Benghazi. Killed by murderers, Africans, brought in by Gaddafi, they killed my father.” Chants of “Gaddafi is a terrorist, Gaddafi is a criminal,” echoed around the Swiss city of Lausanne. For those Libyans abroad there is a very real fear for the future of their loved ones and their country. Copyright © 2011 euronews

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